For almost as many years as I can remember since my husband and I have been together, it has been a tradition in his family that we have colored Easter eggs.  Even before any of us had kids.  We haven’t always spent the holiday with his family, but within a few weekends of Easter, we would usually try to get together, and sure enough, the egg dying kit would come out.

The memories of kids coloring eggs, writing messages on them, fighting over the cups of dye, all bring back a yearning of wanting to keep your kids young forever.  My husband is like that.  A kid forever in his heart.  He will likely be dying Easter eggs until he is 90.  That’s what I love about him, is that he will always be there to keep me young; keep me from getting stagnant.  I love him.

This year, he and I were shopping at Target a couple days before Easter and he practically ran to the Easter aisle looking for the dyes.  His eyes instantly landed on a dying kit called “Molten Lava”.  You should have seen the excitement in his eyes!  He was giddy at the thought of, well, I don’t really know what, but whenever a kid hears molten lava, you have to expect great things.  Right??

Little did we know that this was no ordinary dying kit.  He really should have read the packaging a little deeper than the big huge “Molten Lava” to see that the molten lava, was actually shaved crayons.  And, we had to do the shaving.  It really was a long process just to get eggs ready to dye.  Well, for all those who have dyed eggs in the past, you know that you boil the eggs and let them cool.  Not for this kit!!  You have to place the shavings on the eggs while they’re HOT!  So, back onto the burner the eggs went to heat them up again.

So after all is said and done, our crayon shavings went onto the hot eggs, melted around the eggs and created what I have to admit, are some of the prettiest eggs we have ever “dyed” because this really wasn’t dying, but rather, waxing!

We hope you all had a great Easter weekend!!

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A few weeks ago as I was trying to come out of my slump I got out my macro lens and took some pictures, just to play around a bit.

Our circle this month is focusing on Shallow Depth of Field.

This is where the focus plane is very minute.  A very small part of the image is actually in focus.  It puts the emphasis on a certain part of the image, for instance, in the case of the coins I photographed, the rigid edge.  You can use this to showcase a number of things, details of a piece of jewelry, The point of a pencil, a persons eyes, or anything really.

If you are shooting your camera on manual mode, you can achieve this shallow depth of field by using a wide open aperture.  The aperture is the hole through which light travels to hit your sensor.  The lower the number the more wide open the hole is.  Most of these shots were shot at 2.8 with my macro lens, which is the lowest number this specialty lens goes to.  But you can achieve the same effect using lenses with apertures of 1.2, 1.4, or 1.8 as well.  One of my favorite lenses is my 85 1.8 which provides a gorgeous Shallow Depth of Field.

Maehill_studios_BlogCircle1maehill_studios_blogcircle6maehill_studios_blogcircle2maehill_studios_blogcircle3maehill_studios_blogcircle4Please follow the circle around to see how my friend, DC Birth Photographer Stefanie Harrington views Shallow Depth of Field.

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  • stefanie - Awesome examples and gorgeous work!! You need to put those pencil images on a card and sell them. I’m mildly obsessed.ReplyCancel

    • HLHowarD1970 - You are much too funny stefanie!! thanks for making my day!!ReplyCancel

  • Nadeen - Love seeing your work!ReplyCancel

  • Camille - Hi Heidi! Great examples and good explanation of depth of field,ReplyCancel

  • Carol - Your pix never disappoint! I love your focus on the rough edges…very cool!ReplyCancel

Its been a little while since I’ve been active with my blog circle.  I’ve been in a little photography funk lately, the why is a long story, but I’m hopefully moving past it.  I haven’t even picked up my camera in a long time, but last week I did for a little macro shooting for myself and last night my daughter let me take some pictures of her to demonstrate a photo technique called broad lighting.  I rarely use my flash so I wanted to practice some with it.  Broad lighting is basically lighting the area of the subject that is closest to the camera, while leaving the other side in shadow.  These images were all taken using my 50 1.4, my sb700 flash set up to camera left with a trigger set, and a shoot through umbrella to diffuse the light from the flash.  Please follow the circle around to see how my fellow photographers demonstrate the use of broad light on their own subjects.  Begin here with the talented Emily Morgalis.

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  • Erika - Beautiful portraits Heidi! I love the still life images as well!ReplyCancel

  • Karthika Gupta - Wow! – these are with a flash and diffuser…they are stunning. I love the moodiness of these images. Great job Heidi…ReplyCancel

  • stefanie - this is awesome!! i especially love that 2nd shot of your daughter.ReplyCancel

This past fall, I had the privilege of photographing my niece, Kayla.  I am so happy that she and her mom made the trip to my neck of the woods for this session.  We found some great locations around the St. Cloud area and the fall colors were gorgeous!  Kayla attends High School in Cottage Grove and will graduate this spring.  She has been accepted to Hamline University were she will be studying graphic design and playing her violin in the orchestra.  Enjoy the rest of your senior year and best wishes for a successful college experience!

This is the perfect time to start shopping around for your senior photographer!  Please consider Maehill Studios for yours!!  Contact me for details.

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i had the privilege of capturing Jess’s senior photos a couple weeks ago.  I have know this young woman for so many years.  She is a genuinely sweet, considerate and wonderful person.  I wish you nothing but the best in your future, Jess.  Good luck in your senior year of high school and everything you do beyond.

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